Caliprobola speciosa

Caliprobola speciosa (Rossi, 1790)

Biology & ecology:

The larva is found in wet decaying roots of Beech Fagus sylvatica trees and stumps which form a wet mushy 'porridge'. Adults are regular flower visitors, but are most frequently encountered investigating the bases of trees and large stumps. Reports from entomologists working rotting timber indicate that adults are readily attracted to the scent of rotting timber. Adults have been taken in some numbers in Malaise traps operated in Windsor Forest.

Distribution:

This species is confined to two localities; the New Forest and Windsor Great Park. There is an old record from Staffordshire with very limited data on the Hoverfly Recording Scheme database, reports of occurrence in Derbyshire and South Yorkshire are not supported on the HRS database. There is also a 1990s record of a visual sighting from a locality close to Esher in Surrey, that looks right in terms of habitat.

Status & conservation:

Appears to be stable within its very restricted range. Endangered (RDB1) according to Shirt (1987) and Falk (1991), revised to LOWER RISK (Near Threatened) by Ball & Morris (2014).

Recorded from 5 hectads since 1990.